Book Reviews

Difference between Anarchy and Chaos

V for VendettaV for Vendetta by Alan Moore

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Coming from a leftist state, anarchy is usually a rule of the game. When this novel became popular in Calcutta for every student movement you had the V for Vendetta anonymous masks on hoard of students.

Intrigued I always wanted to know more about the book but couldn’t really get myself to go buy it. So when a friend shared it with at a recent book meet, I just knew I had to read it now. Something which I thought would be easy to go through, took me a week. I kept re-reading, making connects letting everything sink in.

Suitable for every political regime whether it allows freedom of thought or not, this novel clearly distinguishes between anarchy and chaos and brilliantly builds on it.

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Book Reviews

If there was one phrase to describe this book, it has to be heart-wrenching!

Fate BallFate Ball by Adam W. Jones

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The book which began as a simple college love story turns into something so intense that it kept me up all night wanting to know more. If you look at it from a different perspepctive, the book is about the life of an addict and her struggle to break out. She fails miserably and so do the people around her trying to help.

A sense of helplessness, guilt and inability to do anything but wait and watch is what keeps you on your toes. A light read despite being based on a serious plot, the book is simply unputtdownable.

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Book Reviews

A Wrinkle in Time: Fun, imaginative and definitely worth a read

A Wrinkle in Time (A Wrinkle in Time Quintet, #1)A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

There is something about reading children’s books as an adult. You begin to wonder where did all those simple emotions of love, hate, anger, frustration go and when where they replaced by the grey ones, the doubt, the mistrust…

A sci-fi novel, A Wrinkle in Time, is fun, imaginative and very relaxing to read when you are shrouded with work. The concepts shared by the author is timeless and is definitely a must-read given the current world we live in. The explanation of the concept of equality is so beautifully simplified that you feel that why do we as adult complicate every basic notion.

If you are in the mood for something different, pick up this book and you won’t be disappointed.

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Book Reviews

Lanka’s Princess: Not so memorable after all

Lanka's PrincessLanka’s Princess by Kavita Kané

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

My review may be biased as I prefer the Mahabharat epic to the Ramayana of which she is a part. I found her characterisation uniteresting and unrelenting when compared to a Menaka in Menaka’s Choice or an Urvi in Karana’s Wife. But like I said it could be my bias towards the epic; the reason why I’m yet to read Sita’s Sister.

Surpankha or Meenakshi reminded you of someone who is beyond reason and needed a moment of catharisis to even consider a different viewpoint. It reminds you of a lot of the younger generation today who think the world is out to get them and fail to even consider or notice that the people who care are only looking out for them. As such this fast-paced book will appeal to certain lot of people but failed to leave me behind with something.

Worth a read if you are looking for a different point of view for the known epic.

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Book Reviews

A short-hand view of The Sellout

The SelloutThe Sellout by Paul Beatty
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Like all other American Novelists I had read, I thought this one would also be a breeze. I picked up the book from a street stall near home and was hoping to go through it in one go. The colloquial references and off-hand humour had me stopping at every juncture and wanting to re-read the last few paragraphs every time I read the book after a few days. Difficult reading for a reader completely unintiated in LA slang, the book certainly has it quirks and makes some very valid points. And like all novels based on the subject has a very rounded ending with a poigant statement which makes you rethink of what you are and what you actually let the world perceive. All in all, this is one book I would definitely want to re-read only to enjoy the plot line which I esentially derived in my broken reading.

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Book Reviews

Reviewing The Trouble with Women

Seven tight stories. Each equally haunting. Deftly written by Meghna Pant, The Trouble with Women is a must read for who like their stories slightly dark and real. Meghna takes very obvious situations which women in India can usually relate to and portrays them with a removed eye.

You can almost feel the character’s anger, pain, guilt or stress as may the case be. You feel frustrated at Bilal for the way he treats his wife and daughters, you get Zoze for his heartlessness, you are anxious about what will happen if Nikhil finds out and if Sahil’s sister actually goes ahead with what’s going on in her head. You are pained by what Sexy puts herself through to feel liberated and angry at Paalan’s father for the way he treated his mother and definitely you feel sorry, really sorry, for that young girl who has to use her femininity to rise the corporate ladder despite her talent. 

The trouble with woman actually is we think and feel too much and this short collection of stories makes you go through a myriad of emotions in a short span of few days. Each story is way too heavy to read one after the other. And you need that time to think, argue and calm your mind before reading the next one. The book is available on the Juggernaut app and is conveniently priced.

Contrary to perception that nothing can replace a physical book, reading on the app is pretty user friendly with the only irritant being the scroll. If a message or an email needs to be answered while reading, it’s a task to switch without losing your line. Other than that, all is well.

Do scroll through the book and let me know what you felt about it in the comments below.

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Travel

From food haven to ah! well…

So, we recently made the final move to Bombay. And ever since I’ve been craving for good food. After trying various places, we finally hit on some lovely spots.

The first trip for good veg food took us to Matunga, to the age old South Indian restaurant out there called Ram Asharya. True to its name, it’s really a shelter for vegetarians. Lovely coconut chutney, rightly flavoured and warm sambhar, not too overpowering, made every accompaniment a delight. We had some sweet Manglorean breakfast buns, a plate of idly (not comparable to Calcutta’s Jyoti Vihar) (nothing gets even close) and dosas. The best part about the meal were the sweet buns and the butter milk. The butter milk was just so refreshing! Fresh, not creamy, light and flavoured just right.

Another evening took us to a casual dining place at Cadel Road in Dadar called Terttulia. Apparently, an outlet of a famous Pune restaurant, the food was just what I was craving for! I ordered a herbed garlic bread and a homemade ravioli with caramelised onions & gorgonzola cheese in sage brown butter. Both were just delicious.

The herbed garlic bread had a layer soaked in olive oil to hold the herbs on top. The garlic wasn’t too overpowering and nor did the bread go soggy with the oil.

The ravioli was recommended by the waitstaff over a sandwich and I wasn’t too sad about that. The caramelised onions oozed out with every bite, mixing with the base of the dish. The textures, the flavours, the quantity everything was just right and right at that moment I decided I would stop cribbing about Bombay food and just experiment some more. 

The place itself is soothing. It has a Mediterranean look with odd pieces in the corner making you want to appreciate the detailing that went into creating it. A casio was placed on an old singer table near the spot were we were seated. The backdrop old turkish mosaic tiles and hand painted crockery provided a backdrop to our table… All in all it was a lovely experience.

Hoping to find some more such experiences while I make Bombay home once again. If you have any suggestions for me, do write in the comments below.

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