On Books & Reviews

Leaf by Niggle – A must read

Leaf by NiggleLeaf by Niggle by J.R.R. Tolkien

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

If you have read the Lord of The Rings and The Hobbit and think that is Tolkien at his best. Think again.

The simplicity with which this short story is written is just delightful! You wouldn’t know what to take out of this surreal story till you don’t read the Afterword by Tom Shippey where he interprets this story as an allegory as to what was happening in Tolkien’s life with the Middle Earth Saga.

There’s a beautiful line in the story, where two people are talking and one almost feels sorry for the main protaginist– Niggle – mentioning “Oh! poor little Niggle! Never knew he painted.” This one line sums up man’s self doubt, need for recognition and confidence that he is good at what he is does whether it’s distraction or what he does for a living.

Around 64 pages long it’s a perfect metro read. Block yourself from the outside world and enter Tolkien’s Perilous Realm once again.

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On Books & Reviews

An inspiring read

The Corridor of Uncertainty: How Cricket Mended a Torn NationThe Corridor of Uncertainty: How Cricket Mended a Torn Nation by Nihar Suthar

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

A comprehensive light read, The Corridor of Uncertainty is definitely well researched. It’s the fictional story of young Afghan refugees at the Pakistani camp who dreamed of uniting a nation torn with conflict by playing a sport.

The opening pages of the book promised that it would try and avoid cricket jargon and keep it a smooth read for those who don’t understand the game. The story focuses more on the struggle of the young boys in getting a team together till their journey to qualifying for the World Cup 2015.

Thoroughly enjoyable and peppered with comic exchanges between the main protagonists, the story gives you a certain kind of hope. With the current situation worldwide, this story brings respite and resilience in times of despair.

All in all a must read for any cricket lover and otherwise. Anyone looking for something inspiring must pick this up!

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On Books & Reviews

A troublesome journey…

HELL HEAVEN & IN-BETWEEN: One Woman's Journey to Finding LoveHELL HEAVEN & IN-BETWEEN: One Woman’s Journey to Finding Love by Kathryn Hurn

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

It took me almost a month to finish this book. Was it so long that it deserved that time or was it so intense that I couldn’t read more than few chapters a day?

This book was more like reading someone’s diary than a women’s search for just love. It was her entire journey from where she realised who she was, what she has done and how to make the difficult decision of moving on and what follows.

If I wasn’t gifted this book to read and review by the author, I would have probably given up somewhere in the middle. But I just needed to do justice to it and believe that it would make a difference. Somewhere I was so engrossed in Lucy’s emotions that I started feeling those in my relationship as well. Somewhere I just wanted Lucy to move on and to get what she wanted out of life. I knew she and the love of her life would end up together. Kathryn gave that up in the beginning of Volume 2, but how and how long would her ordeal last was not explained. I felt Lucy had the patience of a Victorian heroine something which seems to reoccurring in modern times – while one part of us fights to be independent the other wants to be loved and be provided for irrespective. Ambition does not take away the desire to be loved. Work does not satisfy us emotionally as it would a 21st century man for whom money is more important than a loving relationship.

The book takes you on a journey and you need to patient to let it unravel for you. My three star rating is for some loose ends in the book and the ending. It feels like it could be better rounded off than rushed into given the pace of the earlier portions. I definitely feel it could be way shorter and edited some more.

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Difference between Anarchy and Chaos

V for VendettaV for Vendetta by Alan Moore

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Coming from a leftist state, anarchy is usually a rule of the game. When this novel became popular in Calcutta for every student movement you had the V for Vendetta anonymous masks on hoard of students.

Intrigued I always wanted to know more about the book but couldn’t really get myself to go buy it. So when a friend shared it with at a recent book meet, I just knew I had to read it now. Something which I thought would be easy to go through, took me a week. I kept re-reading, making connects letting everything sink in.

Suitable for every political regime whether it allows freedom of thought or not, this novel clearly distinguishes between anarchy and chaos and brilliantly builds on it.

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If there was one phrase to describe this book, it has to be heart-wrenching!

Fate BallFate Ball by Adam W. Jones

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The book which began as a simple college love story turns into something so intense that it kept me up all night wanting to know more. If you look at it from a different perspepctive, the book is about the life of an addict and her struggle to break out. She fails miserably and so do the people around her trying to help.

A sense of helplessness, guilt and inability to do anything but wait and watch is what keeps you on your toes. A light read despite being based on a serious plot, the book is simply unputtdownable.

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A Wrinkle in Time: Fun, imaginative and definitely worth a read

A Wrinkle in Time (A Wrinkle in Time Quintet, #1)A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

There is something about reading children’s books as an adult. You begin to wonder where did all those simple emotions of love, hate, anger, frustration go and when where they replaced by the grey ones, the doubt, the mistrust…

A sci-fi novel, A Wrinkle in Time, is fun, imaginative and very relaxing to read when you are shrouded with work. The concepts shared by the author is timeless and is definitely a must-read given the current world we live in. The explanation of the concept of equality is so beautifully simplified that you feel that why do we as adult complicate every basic notion.

If you are in the mood for something different, pick up this book and you won’t be disappointed.

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Lanka’s Princess: Not so memorable after all

Lanka's PrincessLanka’s Princess by Kavita Kané

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

My review may be biased as I prefer the Mahabharat epic to the Ramayana of which she is a part. I found her characterisation uniteresting and unrelenting when compared to a Menaka in Menaka’s Choice or an Urvi in Karana’s Wife. But like I said it could be my bias towards the epic; the reason why I’m yet to read Sita’s Sister.

Surpankha or Meenakshi reminded you of someone who is beyond reason and needed a moment of catharisis to even consider a different viewpoint. It reminds you of a lot of the younger generation today who think the world is out to get them and fail to even consider or notice that the people who care are only looking out for them. As such this fast-paced book will appeal to certain lot of people but failed to leave me behind with something.

Worth a read if you are looking for a different point of view for the known epic.

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