Book Reviews

Difference between Anarchy and Chaos

V for VendettaV for Vendetta by Alan Moore

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Coming from a leftist state, anarchy is usually a rule of the game. When this novel became popular in Calcutta for every student movement you had the V for Vendetta anonymous masks on hoard of students.

Intrigued I always wanted to know more about the book but couldn’t really get myself to go buy it. So when a friend shared it with at a recent book meet, I just knew I had to read it now. Something which I thought would be easy to go through, took me a week. I kept re-reading, making connects letting everything sink in.

Suitable for every political regime whether it allows freedom of thought or not, this novel clearly distinguishes between anarchy and chaos and brilliantly builds on it.

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Book Reviews

Lanka’s Princess: Not so memorable after all

Lanka's PrincessLanka’s Princess by Kavita Kané

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

My review may be biased as I prefer the Mahabharat epic to the Ramayana of which she is a part. I found her characterisation uniteresting and unrelenting when compared to a Menaka in Menaka’s Choice or an Urvi in Karana’s Wife. But like I said it could be my bias towards the epic; the reason why I’m yet to read Sita’s Sister.

Surpankha or Meenakshi reminded you of someone who is beyond reason and needed a moment of catharisis to even consider a different viewpoint. It reminds you of a lot of the younger generation today who think the world is out to get them and fail to even consider or notice that the people who care are only looking out for them. As such this fast-paced book will appeal to certain lot of people but failed to leave me behind with something.

Worth a read if you are looking for a different point of view for the known epic.

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Book Reviews

A short-hand view of The Sellout

The SelloutThe Sellout by Paul Beatty
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Like all other American Novelists I had read, I thought this one would also be a breeze. I picked up the book from a street stall near home and was hoping to go through it in one go. The colloquial references and off-hand humour had me stopping at every juncture and wanting to re-read the last few paragraphs every time I read the book after a few days. Difficult reading for a reader completely unintiated in LA slang, the book certainly has it quirks and makes some very valid points. And like all novels based on the subject has a very rounded ending with a poigant statement which makes you rethink of what you are and what you actually let the world perceive. All in all, this is one book I would definitely want to re-read only to enjoy the plot line which I esentially derived in my broken reading.

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