On Books & Reviews

Reviewing The Trouble with Women

Seven tight stories. Each equally haunting. Deftly written by Meghna Pant, The Trouble with Women is a must read for who like their stories slightly dark and real. Meghna takes very obvious situations which women in India can usually relate to and portrays them with a removed eye.

You can almost feel the character’s anger, pain, guilt or stress as may the case be. You feel frustrated at Bilal for the way he treats his wife and daughters, you get Zoze for his heartlessness, you are anxious about what will happen if Nikhil finds out and if Sahil’s sister actually goes ahead with what’s going on in her head. You are pained by what Sexy puts herself through to feel liberated and angry at Paalan’s father for the way he treated his mother and definitely you feel sorry, really sorry, for that young girl who has to use her femininity to rise the corporate ladder despite her talent. 

The trouble with woman actually is we think and feel too much and this short collection of stories makes you go through a myriad of emotions in a short span of few days. Each story is way too heavy to read one after the other. And you need that time to think, argue and calm your mind before reading the next one. The book is available on the Juggernaut app and is conveniently priced.

Contrary to perception that nothing can replace a physical book, reading on the app is pretty user friendly with the only irritant being the scroll. If a message or an email needs to be answered while reading, it’s a task to switch without losing your line. Other than that, all is well.

Do scroll through the book and let me know what you felt about it in the comments below.

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Random thoughts

Day VIII

Desperation.

It’s a weird emotion. Makes you act of character. Blocks your ability to hold back and think.

For that one moment you don’t care. Don’t care about the consequences. You just need to do whatever it is that you are doing. Cause you got to do it. You long to do it. You waited to do it.

Try to reason with a person who’s desperate. Would love to hear her/his illogical defences and see the increasing restlessness in the voice and demeanour.

But once the defences are spoken of the moment’s passed. The person is in character again. The mask is on.

So now say, which is a truer emotion, voice of reason or desperation?

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